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Finding Employers for Work Visas

For the nearly 150,000 people who enter the United States every year on work visas, the employer who they enter the country to work for is a very important factor. Many elements of the employment-based immigration process tie the two together from the start, and a reputable employer on the other end of things can do a lot for someone’s chances of being granted an employment-based visa.

For many people, though, this is a tough cycle – it’s difficult to find and reach out to employers in another country who often don’t speak your native language, and this is all happening before the potential employee has even attained the right to work in the United States. Here are a few tips on the right ways to approach identifying, contacting and working with a potential employer to help get a work-based visa.

Know Your Options

In-depth knowledge of the different kinds of work visas available puts you a step ahead of the field from the jump. The details are important here and could make the difference between an accepted application and a rejected one.

When preparing to apply for a work visa, keep a resource available as a guide for the types of options you have.

Identify Employers With Needs

It may not always feel like it, but in a country as large as the United States, there will always be a market of employers who aren’t able to fill their specific employee needs. There are some telltale signs here if you look carefully: Companies making frequent posts on job ads and looking to hire large numbers of people can be a target. Companies who post the same job title over and over again on popular job boards should be looked at closely, too – they’re probably having trouble filling the position, and might be willing to assist with the immigration process if you can fill it.

Look for Immigration-Friendly Employers

Employers who have gone through the work visa process before are often more willing to do it again, and they usually have the procedures in place. Some companies even have staff devoted to this process. These are good companies to target.

Network

Getting an employment-based visa can be tough, and you don’t want to leave any options unexplored. Talk to anyone you know who has gone through any part of the process, and try to make new connections who have that experience. If you find a potential employer, reach out! The worst that can happen is a simple “no.”

Confused about anything here, or any part of immigration law, or need an immigration lawyer? Kim H. Buhler, Attorney at Law, P.C. is here to help. Contact us at your convenience.